Re.Mark

My Life As A Blog

Ruby Tuesday

with one comment

For a while now, I’ve been interested in dynamic languages – especially the metaprogramming capability.  I’ve dabbled a little in Python – largely out of interest in Django – but a lasting relationship hasn’t formed.  So, I figure it’s time to try Ruby properly.  Here’s the plan:

Read one or two good books
I’ve ordered The Ruby Programming Language, which has already arrived, and The Ruby Way, which hasn’t.  So far, I’ve got a fewty pages into the first book, which seems like a good place to start and will I think, become a useful reference.

Subscribe to a few blogs
Books are all well and good, but there’s nothing like a blog for connecting to the latest developments, ruminations and general goings on in the Ruby community.  Having done a brief scout about the blogosphere wearing Ruby coloured glasses, I’ve subscribed to the following:

Ruby Inside – so chock-full of Rubyness that if there were a place called Rubyville and it had a daily newspaper then this might be it.
Ruby Flow – Ruby Inside’s sister is a community-driven, Ruby focussed link blog.
rubydoes.net – all things IronRuby collected into one handy, easy-to-read blog.
John Lam on Software – it’s written by John Lam and it’s about software, what more could you want?
Jimmy.Thinking – more Silverlit IronRuby information and thoughtfulness.

Try some stuff
There’s not much point in learning Ruby unless you use it to do something.  I don’t have some fiendish plan to build anything specific, but I want to include IronRuby in my programmatic doodlings.

Post regularly
To maintain some momentum, I’m aiming to post about my progress and experience every week – on Tuesdays.  Which makes this post the first in the Ruby Tuesday series.  Any feedback, help, tips and so forth are, of course, greatly appreciated.

 

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Written by remark

April 15, 2008 at 8:32 pm

Posted in Development, Ruby, Software

One Response

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  1. Great news Mark, I think you’ll like ruby.

    One tip I’d offer is to try hard to stay pure TDD if you get stuck into anything decent – from my recent experience doing some heavy work in javascript, the sense of confidence that comes from having a complete set of tests is pretty much vital when working in dynamic languages, without all the safety checks you’re used to in static languages.

    Uncle Bob puts it a lot better than I do.

    Once you start to taste this potent combination of the flexibility of a dynamic language together with the stability of a fully-tested codebase, it’s pretty addictive!

    Check out ZenTest to fuel your ruby TDD fire.

    For help with basic newbie syntax puzzlement (and probably a lot more besides), I’ve always found the folks on the #ruby-lang IRC channel really helpful.

    Matt Wynne

    April 22, 2008 at 3:28 pm


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